A while ago I backed MIOPS, a high-speed camera trigger, on Kickstarter. The idea being, a sub-$200 high speed camera trigger that has support for sound, lightning, laser tripping, time-lapse, HDR or a mix of all the above. You can control it via Bluetooth, using the buttons and colour display on top of the unit, or via a cable that plugs directly into your phone’s audio jack and camera (and operates using sound. Very nifty!)

I had some fun doing high-speed photos (keep an eye out for more posts about this, coming soon), but on the Easter long weekend, I was given the chance to test out the time-lapse feature at Mayday Hills lunatic asylum in Beechworth, Victoria. We walked up to the women’s wing and into a room overlooking the courtyard. I set my camera up, attached my MIOPS, set it to take a shot every 10 seconds, then let it go for two hours while we walked around the place taking photos. The results are amazing:

 

I used Lightroom, and LRTimelapse 3 to deflicker my shots (as MIOPS doesn’t have bulb ramping yet) and added my logo in Windows Movie Maker (a great program for doing quick movie stuff where you don’t need the world.

I’ll do a better review of MIOPS soon, as I’m still playing with the various settings, but I thought I’d share a successful time-lapse

I’ve been out to the wreck of the S.S. Speke at Phillip Island before, but had always wanted to go back again during different weather. So yesterday during our 11 hour trip away from home, I did just that. I had almost decided against it, because I didn’t have my sturdy shoes on, plus you have to climb up a steep hill, battle the heavy winds across the top of the cliff (a few meters from an electric fence), then descend an even steeper hill (where I almost sprained my ankle last time). But as we did a U-turn at the entrance, I thought back to Friday. We had our monthly Google+ hangout for The Arcanum. +Ron Clifford joined in and told some great stories of not wanting to go out taking photos because it was horrible and wet or too far or whatever, but in the end going out and doing it, and catching some amazing shots.

So I said “You know what? Bugger it.”, pulled back in and walked up and over to the wreck. I had to toss my tripod down the hill because it was getting in my way (and I had no straps to attach it to my camera bag), but I managed to get down the wreck and take some great shots, about half an hour before the tide started rolling in.

If you ever feel like something isn’t worth it, do it anyway. You’ll be surprised at the results.